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Space manufacturing yarn produced by the flax industry

The family business is currently run by the fourth generation of Vannestes : Alex Vanneste. We are modifying shortening and refining the long-staple flax and tow into a fiber with the characteristics of cotton, a artificial or synthetic fiber that is suitable to spin on the short staple ring or rotor spinning system. We are certainly the only linen tops supplier offering dyed colors. More than 40 reactive dyed shades are available from stock.

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The centuries-old cultivation of Flanders flax established the country as a major producer of textiles and linen in the Middle Ages, and later led to the development of its world-leading machine-made carpet industry, which continues to this day through major manufacturers such as Balta and Beaulieu International.

Flaxing its muscle… fibres made from the flax plant is one of the strongest amongst natural fibres. There have been significant knowledge synergies across all of these industries in Belgium over the years, and especially in terms of the machinery manufacturers, as technologies and applications developed for specific companies became known to the wider market.

Weaving machinery leader Picanol for example, took part in one of the first international machinery exhibitions held in Beijing in the early s and the company has also been present in India since Today around 2, weaving mills around the world use Picanol machinery — based on over 75 years of technological know-how and experience — totalling over , weaving machines.

To promote its latest generation of Ji jacquard looms, Van de Wiele designed a special truck for a one-year roadshow through China. As a result, it now also has leading positions in tufting machines, extrusion machines for carpet yarns and high-speed jacquards, as well as drives, yarn feeders and various other electronic components. Most recently, it has teamed up with the French machinery builder Superba, to add heat setting machines for carpet yarns to its portfolio.

Products are mainly in the mid and higher segments where high-end technology is a differentiator. In addition to the core products — weaving looms — a vast array of other technologies for weaving mills are in the portfolio, from preparatory to finishing technologies. Europlasma, for example, has in recent years successfully introduced plasma technology — previously employed mainly for ultra-fine cleaning, etching and the physical and chemical activation of surfaces — to the textile sector.

Plantmaster has been designed to bridge the gap between an ERP system and the machines on the shop floor via a common database. The ultimate objective of Industry 4. Its primary objective, however, is to empower management, supervisors and operatives and ensure that when they act upon data, it leads to improvements in overall plant, process and equipment efficiency. Picanol reports that not only are its weaving machines Industry 4.

In the production of special weaving machines for technical textiles, for example, the company employs smart lifting devices to manipulate modules in the most efficient way, along with augmented and virtual reality techniques to receive the information needed at any particular time.

Picanol introduces new generation weaving machines that combine the latest in hardware and software technologies to improve production. Operators receive assembly instructions on tablets to guide them step by step in assembling the parts and monitoring a quality checklist. The wireless digital technology can also be used to ensure that all valuable data and feedback are captured and shared automatically. The use of Industry 4. Adrian Wilson is an experienced analyst and writer specialising in textiles, nonwovens and composites, and current editor of Sustainable Nonwovens, Smart Textiles and Nanotechnology.

From Flanders Flax to Industry 4. Synergies There have been significant knowledge synergies across all of these industries in Belgium over the years, and especially in terms of the machinery manufacturers, as technologies and applications developed for specific companies became known to the wider market.

Augmented reality Picanol reports that not only are its weaving machines Industry 4. Early adopter brands see the benefits of digital developments. From sixty litres to five millilitres with sustainable Industry 4. Nonwovens go from strength to strength. ITMA is open for sustainable innovation. This time it's all about the data. Textile industry looks to growth in composites. Seamless opportunities. Crucial roles for carbon composites. The evolution of embroidery. Sensing smart opportunities in fabrics.

All-in-one solution for when time is of the essence. Technical textiles on the move. A new benchmark for dyes and chemicals. Artificial intelligence operative. Recycling 4. Graphene benefits for textiles and composites.

On-demand in demand. Fabric innovations — from new cottons to living cells. Digital from design to delivery. Connecting the new dots. Towering achievements with 3D textiles. Smart industry is the move forward. Planning for a new digital world. Working with customers closely on tailor-made solutions. Potential bursting at the seams. Driving progress throughout the textile chain through partnerships. Relationships are everything.

Automation takes precedence in sewing sector. Flexibility is the future. Raising awareness in new markets pays dividends. Engineering for a better future. Industry 4. Closer to closing that loop. Technologies in transition and works of art. Looking towards full integration and service. The digital challenge to rotary. Transparency and moral business is the new norm. Happy anniversaries! Collaboration beyond boundaries. Italy at the forefront of the digital revolution.

Colour and coating under consideration. More good news for textiles and clothing manufacturers. The technology vital to the success of technical textiles and nonwovens at ITMA New knitting technologies move beyond apparel. Only growth ahead for fibres and yarns. Much more than just resource efficiency…. Identifying those valuable technical textile niches. Developments everyone in the textile chain now needs to be aware of…. Catching up since ITMA ….

The centuries-old cultivation of Flanders flax established the country as a major producer of textiles and linen in the Middle Ages, and later led to the development of its world-leading machine-made carpet industry, which continues to this day through major manufacturers such as Balta and Beaulieu International. Flaxing its muscle… fibres made from the flax plant is one of the strongest amongst natural fibres.

To browse Academia. Skip to main content. You're using an out-of-date version of Internet Explorer. Log In Sign Up. Gleba, C.

About Flax

Linen has exceptional properties thanks to nature, its composition and the structure of the flax fibers. But how does this wonderful plant actually become a yarn? Linen type spinning describes the spinning process of the linen plant, which also called flax. Other materials, such as cotton or polyester for example, should be processed by other techniques due to the practisability of linen type spinning.

Textile manufacturing by pre-industrial methods

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Download PDF Version. A spinning system in which yarn is made by wrapping fibers around a core stream of fibers with compressed air.

Linen yarn is spun from the long fibers found just behind the bark in the multi-layer stem of the flax plant Linum usitatissimum. In order to retrieve the fibers from the plant, the woody stem and the inner pith called pectin , which holds the fibers together in a clump, must be rotted away. The cellulose fiber from the stem is spinnable and is used in the production of linen thread, cordage, and twine. From linen thread or yarn, fine toweling and dress fabrics may be woven. Linen fabric is a popular choice for warm-weather clothing. It feels cool in the summer but appears crisp and fresh even in hot weather. Household linens truly made of linen become more supple and soft to the touch with use; thus, linen was once the bedsheet of choice. While the flax plant is not difficult to grow, it flourishes best in cool, humid climates and within moist, well-plowed soil.

linen yarns - Import export

At Nafeesa Textiles, we are passionate about unmatched quality and product innovation for yarns. Our production facility covering about , square feet is equipped with 33, ring spindles backed up with state of the art machinery right from Blow room to cone winding. With the present annual production capacity 8.

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They do not damage the ecosystem, they can grow in different climatic zones and they recycle the carbon dioxide for the atmosphere. These plants can contribute to a better agricultural balance in Europe and they will contribute to the growing demand from an expanding population for cellulosic pulp in the next millennium. Some of these green plants like flax and hemp can be used for cleaning soil, polluted by heavy metals, by extracting and removing cadmium, lead, copper and others. The estimated world-wide production of fibrous raw materials from agricultural crops is provided in Table 1. Other possible sources of straw, which could be used as raw materials for applications such as composites and as energy crops are given in Table 2. Table 1: Estimated global tonnage of fibrous raw materials from agricultural crops Crop Plant component Availability ' tonnes Cereals straw: barley straw There are two parallel textile fibre technologies: 2. Though difficult in handling, traditional long flax, ramie and hemp are still produced and processed by slightly modernised methods. These products include: percent linen or ramie knitted apparels. Perfect hygiene and comfort properties make them specially attractive for hot, humid climates ;[33] percent linen and ramie fabrics - from almost transparent to terry type, boasting high "Wash and Wear" properties when finished with liquid ammonia [34] ; percent linen anti-bedsore bedding, developed at the Institute of Natural Fibres for ill and aged people. Tests conducted in Polish Academic Clinic showed that no bedsores occurred when such bedding was used [35] ; percent linen knitted bedding which, according to the research, provides the deepest sleep and best mood recovery.

time an essentially different branch of flax production. making the coarser yarns, twines and fabrics. . This requires time, space, frequent turning, and much.

Linen / Flax

Textile manufacturing is one of the oldest human activities. The oldest known textiles date back to about B. In order to make textiles, the first requirement is a source of fibre from which a yarn can be made, primarily by spinning. The yarn is processed by knitting or weaving to create cloth. The machine used for weaving is the loom. Cloth is finished by what are described as wet processes to become fabric.

The Flax Lab

When Sir George Yeardley returned to Jamestown in , one of his instructions from the Virginia company of London was to promote flax harvesting. The stockholders hoped that, as with silkworm cultivation, viticulture and glass production, the colonists would use this ancient crop to both realize a profit and diversify their labors. Ultimately, none of these ventures was a commercial success. The labor involved was either too intensive or required too much skill, the climate and soil of the Chesapeake region did not cooperate, or plain bad luck attended the operations. That did not mean, however, that wine, silk or linen were never produced in Virginia. Although flax, the plant from which linen is derived, never rivaled tobacco as a cash crop in the Chesapeake, most farmers and plantation owners grew small amounts will into the 's for their own use. The plant which provides the raw material from which linen is made is an annual which grows two to three feet high on a slim, little-branching stem.

We see its ecological consciousness throughout the industry. Mechanical activities are a part of each operation in its transformation — scutching, combing, spinning, weaving. Counting all stages of production, the European linen industry is made up of 10, companies in 14 countries of the EU : a network of interactive professionnals — growers, scutchers, spinners, weavers, knitters, finishers, traders.

A textile [1] is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibers yarn or thread. Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool , flax , cotton , hemp , or other materials to produce long strands.

Production and Ginning of Cotton W. Stanley Anthony. Cotton Yarn Manufacturing Phillip J.

Professor Ryszard M. Professor Koz? Access Online via Elsevier Bolero Ozon. Growing awareness of environmental issues has led to increasing demand for goods produced from natural products, including natural fibres.

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